• Microclimate design guidelines for Naval Air Station China Lake

    Design Guidelines - Microclimate

  • Rendering of landscape with stormwater management features for Naval Air Station China Lake

    Stormwater Landscape

  • Design guidelines for pedestrian right-of-way for Naval Air Station China Lake

    Design Guidelines - Pedestrian Right-of-Way

  • Design guidelines to cope with wind and dust for Naval Air Station China Lake

    Design Guidelines - Wind & Dust

  • Rendering of climate-adapted building for Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake

    Climate-adapted Building

  • Rendering of climate-adapted building for Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake

    Climate-adapted Building

  • Rendering of climate-adapted building for Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake

    Climate-adapted Building

  • Design guideline illustrating seasonal sun paths

    Design Guidelines - Seasonal Sun Paths

  • Infographic illustrating design guidelines for vertical louvers to provide shade

    Design Guidelines - Louvers for Shade

  • Infographic illustrating design guidelines for deep overhangs to provide seasonal shade

    Design Guidelines - Overhangs for Seasonal Shade

  • Section drawing illustrating design guidelines for deep overhangs to provide seasonal shade

    Design Guidelines - Overhangs for Seasonal Shade

Planning for a sustainable, energy-independent future

Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake is a key asset in the Department of Defense Testing and Evaluation infrastructure and, with 1.1 million acres, its largest land holding. The installation’s main tenant is the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, which conducts a range of sensitive and high-hazard research, development, acquisition, test and evaluation activities at the installation. The workforce includes 4,500 civilian scientists, engineers and technical personnel.

Challenge
To meet the emerging operational needs of the Pacific Fleet while minimizing additional infrastructure and facilities, the U.S. Navy’s Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest recognized the need for efficient planning. Master plans would need to align NAWS China Lake with current and future operational requirements, provide quality services to sailors and their families, identify strategies to leverage limited Navy funds, and help the installation to pursue energy independence. 

Solution
Louis Berger developed three master plans that provide a flexible structure to inform planning and development decisions over the next 20 years. Each plan identifies types and locations for development, taking into consideration mission realignment, encroachment, reduction of defense budget, and the call for sustainable development.

The three master plan areas are: South Range, a half-million acre range poised to accommodate new missions; the Armitage Airfield; and the central laboratory and base support “town center” district, Mainsite. The work includes:

  • Development of both short and long range capital investment plans for each area.
  • Development of design standards that address the Navy’s policies on sustainable building, low impact development and energy independence.
  • Development of “form-based” guidelines that address how buildings will relate to one another through harmonious scale, massing and materials.