Solutions for a better world

Missouri River Ecosystem Restoration Plan | United States

  • aerial view of the Missouri River

    Courtesy of USFWS | Joe Riis

  • aerial view of the Missouri River

    Courtesy of USFWS | Joe Riis

  • aerial view of the Missouri River

    Courtesy of USFWS | Joe Riis

  • aerial view of the Missouri River

    Courtesy of USFWS | Joe Riis

  • view of Missouri River
  • fishermen on the Missouri River
  • aerial view of the Missouri River

    Courtesy of USFWS | Joe Riis

  • Missouri River and downtown Kansas City
Protecting the Missouri River ecosystems

The Missouri River is the longest river in the United States, flowing more than 2,300 miles from Three Forks, Montana to its confluence with the Mississippi River near St. Louis. The river has been dammed in six places by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for flood control, water supply, irrigation, navigation, hydropower and recreation purposes.

Challenge
Dam construction and channelization has resulted in changes to the river’s various ecosystems. Fish and wildlife populations have declined, and three animals native to the river are now protected under the Endangered Species Act. USACE is required to prepare a management plan and environmental impact statement (EIS) to mitigate the effects of its actions on these species while continuing to support the dams’ eight purposes. 

Solution
Louis Berger is assisting in developing the plan and EIS within an adaptive management framework to allow USACE to monitor and adjust environmental management practices.

Louis Berger assessed the condition of natural resources along the Missouri River and identified ecological attributes critical to the ecosystem and species, as well as indicators to measure their current conditions.

Louis Berger’s planners, scientists and economists are assisting USACE with modeling of natural and economic resources to facilitate USACE decision-making.  The firm coordinated with 15 federal agencies, 10 state governments, 29 tribal interests, and a wide range of stakeholders including the Missouri River Recovery Implementation Committee. Louis Berger also supported project communications and public involvement, including the public scoping period, stakeholder outreach and the development of project communication tools.