Solutions for a better world

New Jersey Turnpike Interchange 6 to 9 Widening Program | New Jersey, US

  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
  • aerial view of New Jersey Turnpike in New Jersey
Easing congestion on the New Jersey Turnpike

Few highways in America are busier than the New Jersey Turnpike, which serves an average of 680,000 vehicles a day. Completed in 1952 as a 118-mile route with 18 interchanges, it has since grown to 148 miles with nearly double the number of interchanges.

Challenge
Traffic grew steadily on the famed turnpike over the years, especially where the number of lanes decreased from 12 down to six, north of Interchange 8A. That stretch of highway is a link to numerous key destinations for commuters and other travelers.

Solution
The New Jersey Turnpike Authority initiated the widening of 35 miles of the turnpike to improve traffic flow. Louis Berger assisted the Authority in assessing traffic and preparing a plan to ensure the highway will accommodate traffic growth over the next 25 years.

In conjunction with plans to widen the highway, Louis Berger:

  • Developed alternative configurations for five interchanges to improve their traffic-handling capacity and provide access to three service areas.
  • Completed the preliminary engineering and environmental documentation in 16 months and $1 million under budget, which freed up funds for further interchange studies connected to the project.
  • Identified and helped resolve environmental constraints posed by nearby properties, such as wetlands, preserved farmland, special habitats and hazardous materials sites.