Agency: 
American Council of Engineering Companies of New Jersey
Client: 
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
Project: 
World Trade Center Redevelopment Program

The World Trade Center Redevelopment Program (WTCRP) was recognized with an Engineering Excellence Honor award from the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) of New Jersey.

Since 2004, Louis Berger has supported the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in providing program management services for the $15 billion WTCRP. The redevelopment involves more than 100 consultants and contractors, representing more than 62,000 employees worldwide. Louis Berger was called upon to manage delivery of multiple projects. This included developing an integrated master schedule containing more than 50,000 actions, and providing earned value analysis, cost management, invoice management, program risk assessment and communications services. Four of the signature projects under the program – One World Trade Center, the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, the West Concourse of the World Trade Center Transportation Hub, and PATH Platform A/Track 1 – all opened for use in 2014.

The ACEC Engineering Excellence Awards celebrate the most outstanding project achievements in the field of engineering around the world. Projects are judged based on originality, innovation, value to the public and the engineering profession, complexity, social and economic considerations, sustainability, and exceeding client needs.

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World Trade Center Redevelopment | New York, NY, US

Following the tragic attacks of September 11, 2001, Louis Berger was selected by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to serve as program manager of the first phase of the World Trade Center (WTC) site redevelopment. Following the 2004 completion of the first phase of restoration, Louis Berger was awarded a second contract to manage the construction of a new Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) terminal, the WTC Memorial and Museum, and One World Trade Center, the tallest skyscraper in the United States.    More >